Original World War 1 Zig-Zag Clock

Original World War 1 ‘ZIG – ZAG’ Clock

Mounted in a mahogany box with glazed door, these clocks were made without a bezel or glass as it has movable contacts attached to the external bezel, at the base of the clock are two screw fitted terminals to which the bell and/or buzzer was connected. The minute hand would have carried the electrical connector which triggered the contact points.

The dial is painted with Roman numerals, subsidiary seconds dial and signed Heath and Sons, London.

The ‘Zig-Zag’ clock was used for ships in convoy on an attempt to avoid torpedo bombing as the ships continually zig zagged. They required a signal to tell them exactly when to change course, these Zig-Zag clocks would have been kept on the bridge and every time the bell rang as the minute hand passed the contact this was the signal to change course. The whole convoy would change direction in unison so as to avoid collision. This made the ‘Zig-Zag’ clock a very important tool in the war at sea.

The movement of this Zig-Zag clock was made by Seth Thomas (American) in approximately 1915.

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